Wallingford Berks Line

Valentina Ivy Campbell LovelockAge: 98 years19072005

Name
Valentina Ivy Campbell Lovelock
Given names
Valentina Ivy Campbell
Surname
Lovelock

Valerie Lovelock

Name
Valerie Lovelock
Given names
Valerie
Surname
Lovelock
Birth February 9, 1907
Text:

1907 LOVELOCK VALENTINA I C [Father] CHARLES W A [Mother] IDALIA [Reg Dist] ALBURY [Reg No] 753/1907

Publication: Personal Research Papers
Birth of a brotherCharles Lionel Hubert Lovelock
September 7, 1908 (Age 18 months)
Text:

Name: Charles L H Lovelock Birth Date: 1908 Father's name: Charles D Lovelock Mother's name: Idalia Birth Place: New South Wales Registration Year: 1908 Registration Place: Junee, New South Wales Registration Number: 36499

Text:

Copy of Birth Certificate held by Shaun Eastment.

Death of a paternal grandfatherCharles Wright Lovelock
July 7, 1909 (Age 2 years)
Citation details: Copy of Death certificate held by Shaun Eastment.
Text:

1909 LOVELOCK CHARLES W [Father] JAMES [Mother] [not stated] [Reg Dist] JUNEE [Reg No] 9614/1909

Publication: May 2003
Birth of a brotherMaxwell George Lovelock
May 27, 1913 (Age 6 years)
Source: Newspaper
Death of a paternal grandmotherEmma Abigail Butler Clarke Wilson
September 24, 1933 (Age 26 years)
Text:

Copy of Death certificate held by Shaun Eastment.

Publication: Ancestry.com
Text:

Name Emma A Lovelock Death Date 1933 Death Place New South Wales Father's Name Robert Mother's Name Margaret Registration Year 1933 Registration Place Temora New South Wales Registration Number 13665

Death of a fatherCharles Alexander Wright Lovelock
September 13, 1960 (Age 53 years)
Text:

1960 LOVELOCK CHARLES WRIGHT A [Father] CHARLES WRIGHT [Mother] EMMA ABIGAL [Reg Dist] ALBURY [Reg No] 24996/1960

Publication: Personal Research Papers
Burial of a fatherCharles Alexander Wright Lovelock
1960 (Age 52 years)
Publication: Personal Research Papers
Death of a motherIdalia Maria Attwater
1964 (Age 56 years)
Text:

1964 LOVELOCK IDALIA [Father] GEORGE [Mother] IDALIA [Reg Dist] ALBURY [Reg No] 24613/1964

Death of a husbandWilliam J. Lidden
June 9, 1969 (Age 62 years)
Publication: Personal Research Papers
Burial of a husbandWilliam J. Lidden
1969 (Age 61 years)
Publication: Personal Research Papers
Death of a brotherCharles Lionel Hubert Lovelock
August 6, 1979 (Age 72 years)
Publication: Personal Research Papers
Death August 25, 2005 (Age 98 years)

Source: Ryerson Index
Publication: http://ryersonindex.net/
Text:

LIDDEN Valentina Death notice 25 AUG 2005 Death 98 Central Coast Express Advocate 31 AUG 2005

Burial
Publication: Personal Research Papers
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
herself
brother
Private
younger brother
5 years
younger brother
Mother’s family with William Tanner - View this family
step-father
mother
Marriage: 1901Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Family with William J. Lidden - View this family
husband
William J. Lidden
Birth: December 16, 1901Junee, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 9, 1969Mittagong, New South Wales, Australia
herself
son
Private
daughter
Private

BirthNSW BDM On-Line
Text:

1907 LOVELOCK VALENTINA I C [Father] CHARLES W A [Mother] IDALIA [Reg Dist] ALBURY [Reg No] 753/1907

BirthGwen Eastment
Publication: Personal Research Papers
DeathRyerson Index
Publication: http://ryersonindex.net/
Text:

LIDDEN Valentina Death notice 25 AUG 2005 Death 98 Central Coast Express Advocate 31 AUG 2005

BurialGwen Eastment
Publication: Personal Research Papers
Shared note

Valerie was encouraged by her Scottish Gran to learn dancing, especially Highland Fling and Crossed Swords and to wear the Campbell tartan as a basic colour for a special dance dress.

Val Lovelock describes what it was like to attend school in Junee in the years 1914 into the 1920s.

The children carried small cases or leather shoulder bags.

In summer the girls dressed in a dress, with their own choice of print. The dress came to the knee and was "magyar" shape. Under the dress girls wore a cotton singlet and plain, very wide, white, cambric bloomers, with elastic around the waste and legs. Petticoats were white lawn, crocheted around the hem, neck and armholes. The hems were sometimes scalloped.

Sox were mostly white, some with lacey patterns. The sox had garters. Stockings were worn by older children, often with elastic tops. Shoes were plain black with one strap over the foot and buttoned on the side.

Hats were straw or Panama, by personal choice. However, veils were not allowed. Elastic was usually fastened under the chin and a coloured ribbon was worn around the brim join.

In the winter months the cotton singlet was replaced with a white one made of wool. Petticoats were made of flannelette, usually white or cream, with crocheted edges on the neck and hems and possibly a design on the front.

The dress was made of woollen material and jumpers, cardigans and gloves were usually worn. Stockings were black and ribbed or plain "lisle". A woollen Tam O'Shanta hat might be worn.

Physical culture lessons were a lot of marching around the school in various designs. The children learnt signals for the various patterns required. This activity was hot in summer but good on cold days. There were also "club" or drill exercises, movement exercises, bar bells, various ball eg Tunnel Ball and other games such as "Prisoner's Base". Their was a games hour on Friday afternoons.

Popular children's games in the playground were Drop the Handkerchief, Rounders, Twos and Threes, skipping (plain and French using two ropes at once), Hopscotch (which wore out shoes) using old tobacco tins filed with sand as "tors", marbles. Girls were not supposed to play marbles so they used to play behind the school opposite the Methodist Church. Once the school inspector discovered the girls in their 'illicit' pursuits, confiscated their marbles and gave them a severe lecture.

School hours were 9am to 11am, followed by playtime, then more lessons and a lunch break at 12.30 when everyone went home for lunch. School recommenced at 2pm and finished at 4pm.

The school rooms were very old, having been built around 1900. There were no infant school rooms until 1915/16 when an infants block was finally built. The walls needed painting and the classrooms were cold in winter in spite of a wood fire. The desks were 'forms', that is long row seating fitting about six. Each student had their own inkwell which was filled every Monday morning by two selected helpers. Students brought their own pens and nibs, blotting paper, rulers and pencils.

The blackboards were on a moveable platform, one board in front of another. In smaller classes, blackboards might be attached to the wall. Copy books were used for writing practice and the Jones Reading System was used to teach reading. Great effort was put into designing the covers on homework books, which were covered with plain, brown paper and cut out pictures of flowers and gardens were pasted on. Spelling 'bees' were popular, using long, brown spelling books. A class was broken up into four teams who competed for the best spelling result each week.

School assemblies were held every Monday morning in the quadrangle. The children assembled at bell time. This was followed by music. At the Assemby the flag was raised, the children sang "God Save the King" which was then the National Anthem and other Commonwealth songs such as "Rule Brittannia". At the saluting of the flag, the children were required to say, "I love my God, I honour my King, I salute the flag".

Presently living in Gosford, NSW with her daughter.